FIRST WORLD WAR

Sunday marks 100 years since the end of the First World War. The War created a seismic shift culturally, politically, geographically and technologically – its ramifications are still being felt. The necessity of the War brought with it huge advances in all sectors of engineering. Over the last 4 years we have been looking at how engineering and the War impacted each other. Engineers at War: from Home … Continue reading FIRST WORLD WAR

REACH FOR THE STARS

Man’s fascination with Mars goes back millennia. Mars is also one the few heavenly bodies on which we see surface features; these have inspired the imagination of everyone from scientists, to artists, to writers. The records of Martian observation date back to the 2nd millennium BC when Egyptian astronomers observed the planet and recorded its position. It was portrayed on the ceiling of the tomb … Continue reading REACH FOR THE STARS

WWI engineering workshop

CELEBRATING WOMEN

International Women in Engineering Day is a global celebration of women past, present and future. As was the case in many professions, female pioneers in mechanical engineering had to work hard to break into a male dominated profession. The issue of women members was first raised in the Institution of Automobile Engineers (IAE) in May 1907. Miss Cleone de Heveningham Benest (1880-1963) wrote to find out … Continue reading CELEBRATING WOMEN

Viaduct across the Sankey

STEPHENSON ONLINE

George Stephenson is rightly known as a great engineer. He is primarily associated with railways but he was active in other areas – there were lively debates, encompassing supporter’s gatherings, witness statements and letters, discussing whether he or Humphrey Davy invented the safety lamp. Here at IMechE, we hold a large collection of Stephenson material, both for George and Robert, and their companies – including … Continue reading STEPHENSON ONLINE

Last arch of Blackfriars

BLACKFRIARS

Today, a train journey into London crossing over Blackfriars Railway Bridge provides the curious sight of a series of bright red bridge columns stretching out across the Thames. A clue to the origin of these columns lies at the South side of the river; a splendidly restored abutment displaying the insignia of the London, Chatham and Dover Railway (LC&DR).   The columns mark the position … Continue reading BLACKFRIARS

WWI engineering workshop

EMPOWERING WOMEN

This week marks 100 years since (some) women got the vote in this country. It is also 100 years since a woman first presented a paper at the Institution. Olive Monkhouse talked about The Employment of Women in Munitions Factories. World War I brought with it a huge increase in demand for munitions, at the same time the workforce was reduced by men signing up … Continue reading EMPOWERING WOMEN

Hercules

DAVID JOY

The modern engineer can research and record engineering ideas using mobile devices and camera phones, as well as more traditional methods. In the 19th century engineers carried notebooks and a pencil to sketch designs on the move.  A man who exemplifies the image of the Victorian engineer as artist is David Joy, born in Leeds in 1825.  A collection of his drawings and his diary … Continue reading DAVID JOY

Latest project before painting.

CHERRY HILL

Cherry Hinds Hill is a well-known name to those in the model engineering world and her models are considered remarkable for their quality. The Duke of Edinburgh Challenge Trophy and the Championship Cup has been won by Cherry 9 times. Yet she has always maintained a low profile-she has allowed her work to speak for her. Cherry’s models are based on both historic working engines … Continue reading CHERRY HILL

WOMEN RIDERS

Kitty May Brunell was one of a clutch of women motorsport riders in the 1920s-1930s. Born in 1911, Kitty grew up surrounded by racing. Her father was Bill Brunell (officially William Joseph Brunell), a well-known photographer of motorsports. Her mother was Katie Margaret Meech. Brunell officially began rallying in 1928, she was only seventeen at the time, but it seems she stopped around 1933. Despite … Continue reading WOMEN RIDERS

BEAULIEU: VISIT REPORT

Recently we were invited to visit the workshops at the National Motor Museum where they are working to restore the 1927 1000hp Sunbeam twin engines that hopefully be running again in March (more on that in a future post!). The Museum tells the story of the advancement of the motor cars and propelled transport, from penny farthings, to steam cars, to icons such as the … Continue reading BEAULIEU: VISIT REPORT